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Sending Children To Govt Schools May Become Compulsory For Karnataka State Employees

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Picture Source: News World India

By JAVED SAIFI 

https://www.newsworldindia.in/national/sending-children-to-govt-schools-may-become-compulsory-for-karnataka-state-employees/307830/

In a bid to improve the quality of education, the Karnataka government is considering a proposal to make compulsory for state government employees to send their children to government schools rather than private schools.

Primary and Secondary Education minister N Mahesh was quoted by Hindustan Times as saying, “We are considering bringing in a policy on the basis of a report to encourage enrolment in government schools.”

“By making government employees enroll their wards in government schools, we hope to make them stakeholders in the betterment of these schools,” Mahesh added.

In order to implement the proposal the Karnataka government is seeking a legal opinion.

“We have asked for legal opinion to ensure that we do not go against some judgments of the Supreme Court, where it held that state governments cannot dictate the choice of the school of the children. We are looking at ways to overcome this,” Mahesh said.

The move is based on the Kannada Development Authority (KDA) report published in September 2017 that suggested “those who draw a salary from the government have to mandatorily send their children to government schools and not private ones. And there should be a provision to punish those who flout this rule.”

In the month of June, it was proposed in Karnataka to pilot English-medium classes in 1,000 government schools. 

According to a survey during 2011-15, the total enrolment in government schools fell by 11.2 million, whereas in private, it rose by 16 million.

posted Sep 3, 2018 by Gowri Vimalan

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Picture Source: Bangalore Mirror

By- Kumaran P

https://bangaloremirror.indiatimes.com/bangalore/others/karnatakas-schools-to-secure-a-no-plastic-pledge/articleshow/65814017.cms

Educationists have urged the State Government to ban plastic within all school limits of the state and stop the use of plastic material in and around every school.

The Department of State Educational Research and Training (DSERT) has asked all schools in the State to take a pledge and get families and parents of the students to sign up to stop the use of plastic completely.

The principal of a Poornapramathi School in Girinagar, Bengaluru, Shashirekha had recently written a letter to the principal secretary of the Department of Education urging a stop to the use of plastic materials in the school and also in their surroundings. The department officials sent this request to DSERT to make a state-wide plan.

The DSERT has asked the schools with the help of district and block officials throughout the State to ensure that, school children, their parents, families and neighbouring village members take a pledge on this.

Shalini Rajneesh, principal secretary to the government (Primary and Secondary Education Department), said, “There are 10 points mentioned in the pledge note and that should be internalised by all. Our kids will drive it home literally. And schools should be the first to be a plastic-free zone.”
Educationist Nagesh Hegde and Shashirekha informed the department that this activity will be one of its kind in India if implemented in all the schools of the State.

+1 vote

BENGALURU: While modern educationalists  believe that extra-curricular activities play an important role in moulding GenNext  and sports administrators  dream of producing  world class talent,, the situation on the ground is rather dismal.
As per the latest government data, only five of the 778 elementary and secondary government schools in the Bengaluru educational division have playgrounds. Primary and secondary education minister Tanveer Sait shared it in the legislative council on March 24 to a question raised by Ganesh Karnik (BJP). 

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/bengaluru/in-bengaluru-only-5-of-778-govt-schools-have-playgrounds/articleshow/58057418.cms 

According to the state's sports policy, at least 1 acre for a primary school and 2.5 acres for an upper primary school should be available for use as playgrounds. If playgrounds are not available, the Karnataka Knowledge Commission said schools should allocate space for common playfields and playgrounds within 2kms.

Irrespective of the correct number, the fact remains that many government schools do not have playgrounds. In most such schools, students don't engage in outdoor games or physical training due to lack of playgrounds.  
The unwritten rule, according to official sources, is that schools without playgrounds must focus on indoor games and theoretical aspects of sports. "The physical education subject, compulsory in schools, is 50 per cent theory and 50 per cent physical activity. In the indoor games category, most schools without playground teach yoga and simple exercises for healthy living,'' said an official.  

+1 vote
State education minister has clarified couple of days ago that rules and requirements are now being drafted to implement state education syllabus for classes up to VIII in Karnataka - amongst the ICSE and CBSE schools. In the meantime the CBSE board apparently has clarified that they do not actually prescribe a syllabus up to class VIII in any case. Full story here: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/bengaluru/cbse-icse-schools-will-have-to-follow-state-syllabus-in-karnataka/articleshow/58146344.cms
+2 votes

                                                       

Photosource  Deccan Heraldd         Image for Representation

There is just one child available for every nine adoptive parents in India waiting to take a child home

http://www.deccanherald.com/content/619534/only-1766-children-15200-adoptive.html

As of May 2017, there were 15,200 prospective adoptive parents (PAPs) while child care institutions (CCIs) have only 1,766 children in their care across the country. Of these, 1,279 are children with special needs, according to CARINGS, the Child Adoption Resource Information and Guidance System.

"About 70-80 percent of PAPs want healthy normal children below the age of two years. That means around 10,000 parents want to adopt the 59 children in the age group available with child care institutions across the country. The discourse around adoptions in this country needs to change," said Avinash Kumar of Families of Joy, a non-profit consisting of a group of adoptive families.

Kumar is also a member of Child Adoption Resource Authority's (CARA) steering committee.

Of the 1,766 children currently available for adoption, only 59 are below two years of age, the most preferred age group for Indian PAPs; 339 are normal children above the age of two years, 89 are siblings and 1,279 are children with special needs.

The CARINGS data, collated by Families of Joy, says state wise figures also reflect the national trend.

With around 155 children over the age of two and around 10 below two, Orissa tops the list of states with maximum adoptable children. Maharashtra has 20 children below two and 298 above two years, while Andhra Pradesh has around two children below two years and 148 above the age of two.

"We did a process of immediate placements for hard to place children -- older children and children having minor ailments or corrective diseases. We managed to place 300 of them. Every year, only 30-35 special needs children are placed with Indian PAPs, but most such adoptions take place inter- country," CARA chairperson Deepak Kumar told PTI.
Official CARA adoption statistics show that while the number of Indian adults registered with the agency has more than doubled in under a year -- from 7,000 last July to 15,200 this May -- the number of adoptions has steadily dipped.

According to figures available on the CARA website, there were 5,964 in-country adoptions between January 2011 to March 2012 and only 3,210 from April 2016 to March 2017.

Officials explain this dip saying that adoption figures are dwindling globally because of a variety of reasons such as birth control being more widely used and there being less of a taboo against unwed mothers. Both these trends result in fewer babies being abandoned or surrendered for adoption, which in turn leads to fewer adoptions.

Explaining the fewer number of children available for adoption, Ian Anand Forber Pratt, director, Children's Emergency Relief International, says most "orphans" living in CCIs are not "orphans".

"These children have families and they continue to stay in orphanages because there is no effort to strengthen the family structure or reintegrate them with their families. If the CCI cannot send them back to their families then they should consider family based child care options, including adoption," he said

 

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+2 votes

Picture Credits:DC

Bengaluru: The transformation of a government school which had hardly 70 students in the rolls to a school now aspired by many is the face-changing story of Government V.K.O School at Shivajinagar.

With over 100 years of history, the school that was officially inaugurated after a revamp worth Rs 16 crore, now as applicants streaming in, even days after the start of the new academic year.

The school now has more than 1500 students. “It was totally overwhelming that 7,900 students approached us for admissions this year out of which 1,569 were admitted,” said Syed Athar Pasha, acting Principal and Administrative Advisor.

Formerly known as V.K. Obaidulla Govt Urdu School, the institution at present offers education in various mediums including English, Urdu, and Kannada. “Students from the sixth grade and above are given two options to chose from – English and Kannada. From high school level, each student can pick up Urdu or Hindi as the third language, English and Kannada being the first two respectively,” Pasha explained.

 With 42 smart class rooms, lab facilities, library, recreational rooms and dining halls spread across four floors at the campus, a visit to the school would make one relook at the stereotype of  a government school. Sixty new teachers were hired this year to the existing 24 appointed by the government.The revamp was done by I Monetary Advisory Council (IMA), the charitable wing of IMA group. Speaking to Deccan Chronicle, Mohammed Mansoor Khan, President of the Advisory Council affirms that the council seeks to provide facilities to the needy as its primary objective since its inception.

“The school which is located at a key area in the city with a populous community residing around was not up to the standard. With demand for quality education on the rise, a complete makeover was necessary for the survival of the institution.” He also attributes the basic thought behind taking up the project to state minister R. Roshan Baig, who is also an alumnus of the school.

The school is under constant surveillance with a total of 126 CCTV installed at various points, including classrooms. The school administration has also developed a smart phone application through which parents can monitor the developments of their wards at the campus.

Nearby residents are elated with revamped school and are keen to seek admission for their wards. “It is a blessing that a school with such facilities have started working in our area. If not this year, I’ll apply earlier next year to ensure my son gets a seat here,” said Majeed Salam, a parent. The renovated institution was officially inaugurated recently by CM Siddaramaiah.

Number of Students
463 – Kindergarten
572 – Lower Primary
354 – Upper Primary
180 – High-School
1569 – Total

 

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