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How schools should help children handle stress? Meet to discuss in July

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Picture Credits:TOI

Schools merely focus on the academic aspect of a child’s life. Though a student spends the larger share of his/her day in schools, social and emotional development of the child receives little attention. 

This is the premise of the three-day ‘Schools that Care 2017’ conference being organised by The Teacher Foundation (TTF) from July 13 to 15. 

“When children come out of school and move into college or a workplace, they should be capable of handling internal and external stress. Adults influence the development of social and emotional competencies in children and since they spend so much time in school, the environment there should be gentle and caring,” said Maya Menon, the director of the foundation. The conference will also mark 15 years of the existence of the foundation, which trains and supports teachers to impart education effectively. 

The first day of the conference will be on the theme ‘Caring to Learn, Learning to Care’ and will explore why ideas like empathy and tolerance are important in schools. The keynote address will be delivered by Roger Weissberg, professor of psychology at the University of Illinois. There will be a panel discussion on the day’s theme with the participation of Dr Shekhar P Seshadri, child psychiatrist and professor at Nimhans, writer Aakar Patel and film maker Shabnam Virmani, among others. TTF will release key findings from its study on ‘Standards for Social and Emotional Learning for Indian Schools’. 

Talks and discussions on the second day will deal with how schools can shift focus to emotional development. The keynote address will be delivered by educationist Jenny Mosley who created a ‘Circle Time’ model for educational training. 

The third day will have a discussion with a panel of students who will talk about their perspectives on school. 
Principals, teachers and educationists from across the country will be taking part in the conference. 
 

References

DH News Service, Bengaluru, Jun 21 2017
posted Jun 21, 2017 by Sidharth Appu

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The terms ‘stress’ and ‘studying’ are practically interlinked in our cultural mindscapes. That children and youth will undergo travails as they move through school and college is accepted by both parents and educators. Even as we rant that children are under too much pressure, or that education is a crazy rat-race, our kids continue to be caught in a trying and demanding net of cultural expectations.

http://www.deccanherald.com/content/610858/for-stress-free-school-environment.html

Most of us know from experience that a certain amount of stress actually helps us perform better in tests and exams. While limited, short bursts of positive stress or eustress is conducive for learning, we have to ensure that children are not subjected to distress on a daily basis. By adopting various measures to address the multiple needs of students, schools and colleges may ensure that education is a positive, purposeful and pertinent experience for all.
 

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photo source The Hindu

Chief Minister Siddaramaiah’s home district Mysuru has the stiff target of enrolling 25,000 candidates under the Kaushalya Karnataka Mission – the State government’s ambitious employability programme

Laiqh A. Khan ​                 On June 24, Mysuru had registered 24,094 candidates

http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/karnataka/kaushalya-karnataka-mission-mysuru-has-stiff-target-to-meet/article19146303.ece

Though Mysuru got off to a slow start and had enrolled no more than 8,500 candidates or 34% of the target by June 9 after the programme was kickstarted on May 15, the district had made enough progress subsequently with officials fanning out in different places including educational institutions to enrol people.

The Kaushalya Karnataka Mission seeks to enrol people in the age group of 18 to 35 to enhance their employability through skill development.

By Saturday, the pace of registrations in Mysuru district had picked up and reached 24,094. D. Randeep, Deputy Commissioner, was confident of Mysuru not only crossing the target but also reaching 30,000 by the end of June. By the time the training programmes for the enrolled candidates begin in mid-July, the district administration was hopeful of crossing 35,000.

While Mysuru was yet to reach 25,000 registrations, as many as 20 other districts in the State had crossed their target. A few districts in North Karnataka such as Raichur, Gadag, Kalaburagi, Ballari and Bagalkot had achieved more than double their targets with Raichur leading the pack with more than 400% registrations against its target of 15,500.

Officials said the registration target in the Chief Minister’s home district is the third highest in the State after Bengaluru and Belagavi. While Bengaluru has to register 93,400 candidates, Belagavi had long crossed its target of 36,400.

The targets for each district had been fixed by the newly created Department of Skill Development, Entrepreneurship and Livelihood taking into consideration a range of aspects such as population and backwardness.

Interested youngsters can still enrol for the programme by accessing the Karnataka Kaushalya Mission website www.kaushalkar.com.

Though most of the candidates registered under the programme so far either had passed either SSLC, PUC or Bachelors, officials said even school and college dropouts could register for the scheme.

“Our officials visit various places including railway stations and bus stands to identify dropouts and register them. Invariably, such people do not have email accounts and are not carrying their Aadhaar card. We create email accounts for them, ask them to get their Aadhaar details and register them,” an official

 

 

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Photosource webcrawler.com

To develop government schools, the state is now planning to rope in old students. To start with, it has asked all government schools to form old students association from the current academic year


Today, many people who have studied in government schools are in good positions within and outside the country. The Department of Public Instructions has decided to bring them under a single umbrella of ‘alumni association’ to improve the conditions at government schools.

http://www.newindianexpress.com/cities/bengaluru/2017/jun/27/karnataka-plans-to-develop-government-schools-with-help-of-alumni-network-1621225.html

It is an initiative taken by the Karnataka State Commission for Protection of Child Rights, which is being implemented through the district administrations. According to the information available from the commission, all government schools in the state should have ‘alumni associations’ by July 16. 

Kripa Alva, chairperson of the commission said, “I have been personally visiting schools and also meeting officials concerned at district and taluk levels to implement it. We are aiming to complete the formation of associations within a month.”

During my visit to government schools, I got to know that some of them have been developed by their old students. Hence the idea of old students association at government schools struck my mind,” she added.Private schools in the state are already having alumni associations, which help in their development in every possible way.

“These associations hold annual events and support schools financially and morally. We are sure that alumni of respective government schools will also come forward to develop the schools in which they studied,” Alva said. 

How it will be conceptualised
The authorities of all 54,000 government schools will verify the admission registers of last 10 to 25 years. They will  identify the residential address of the students and will send them invitations regarding setting up of old students association. In each letter, the contact number of the head master or the teacher in-charge of the school will be mentioned. Later, an official inauguration of the association will be done, where all students will be invited.

 

 

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Photo Credits: TOI

BENGALURU: It's common for politicians to do nothing but crib about the dwindling number of students in government schools. But a politician-official partnership in Hubballi-Dharwad has managed to arrest this negative trend with a simple strategy: starting pre-primary (kindergarten) classes in government schools.
The move has yielded positive results as the student intake in Dharwad Urban division has increased by 2,247 students in 61 government schools between 2015-16 and 2017-18. Inspired by the outcome, the government is contemplating starting kindergarten classes in all government schools across the state next year. The finance department is currently evaluating the proposal.


MLA, Hubbali-Dharwad (West), Arvind Chandrakant Bellad, whose brainchild it was to start kindergarten classes in government schools, said: "We realized that not many parents were putting their kids in government schools because the entry-level age for first standard is five years and ten months. So, parents preferred to send their kids, who have attained three years and ten months and out of playschool, to lower kindergarten (LKG) in private schools. The usual tendency among parents is to continue their kids in private schools and, hence, the number of kids in government schools was low. We decided to bridge the gap between playschool and first standard by commencing kindergarten classes in government schools."


The move was not an easy one, given the legal hurdles and financial implications involved. Bellad started with the government school at Kelageri village near Dharwad by taking members of the school development and monitoring committee (SDMC) and local education department officials into confidence."We decided to pool in resources and rope in teachers from outside for kindergarten classes. It worked and the number of admissions gradually shot up. The same model was replicated in 36 out of the 63 schools in 201415. It was extended to 40 schools in 2015-16 and 61 schools in 2017-18."

The education department officials too joined hands by redeploying staff."Some schools had teachers who had little work and some had physical training teachers with less work load. Such teachers were engaged in kindergarten. Of course, they were sensitized about the needs of kids and the larger goal of getting and retaining more students in government schools. We also got teachers from outside by paying them a monthly honorarium of Rs 3,000-4,000," said Bellad. What has made these kindergarten popular among parents is the fact that emphasis is being laid on teaching English along with Kannada.

Education department officials recently briefed primary education minister Tanveer Sait about the initiative and he was quite appreciative of it

By Rakesh Prakash

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