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Karnataka may stop reimbursing school fee of RTE students

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BY- B V Shiva Shankar

https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/bengaluru/karnataka-may-stop-reimbursing-school-fee-of-rte-students/articleshow/61972988.cms

BENGALURU: Under pressure to save government schools from closure, Karnataka may do away with the fee reimbursement scheme implemented under the Right of Children to Free and Compulsory Education (RTE) Act, 2009.

Under RTE, the state government pays the fees of underprivileged students enrolled in private schools under the 25% quota. Karnataka is now mulling to stop reimbursing the amount, leaving private schools to face the burden.

Sources in the department of public instruction (DPI) said the cabinet would discuss a proposal to relook at the 25% RTE quota in private schools. Arelated law is likely to be passed in the legislature during the next budget session, which would be the last session of the Congress government. "The government had announced in the 2017-18 budget that a new school education policy would be formulated. The new policy covering all aspects, including RTE, is being prepared," said P C Jaffer, commissioner of public instruction.

Incidentally, the RTE Act that the Siddaramaiah government is seeking to undermine was enacted by the Congress-led UPA government after extensive consultations.

Declining to get into the details, Jaffer said it is up to the government to take a decision on RTE in the state.

When contacted, minister for primary and secondary education Tanveer Sait confirmed that the government is looking at re-designing RTE with its main focus being strengthening government schools. "There is a belief that private schools are thriving at the cost of government schools. We need to set things right. The policy is almost ready and it will be placed before the next cabinet meeting," said Tanveer Sait.

Karnataka implemented RTE in 2012. While 1,778 government schools have been closed since then, 3,189 private institutions have come up during the same period.

Taking note of the decline in the fortunes of government schools, the Kannada Development Authority (KDA) in October submitted a report to the government, urging it to nix RTE.

 

References

Karnataka under pressure to save government schools from closure,
posted Dec 11, 2017 by Gowri Vimalan

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Photosource webcrawler.com

To develop government schools, the state is now planning to rope in old students. To start with, it has asked all government schools to form old students association from the current academic year


Today, many people who have studied in government schools are in good positions within and outside the country. The Department of Public Instructions has decided to bring them under a single umbrella of ‘alumni association’ to improve the conditions at government schools.

http://www.newindianexpress.com/cities/bengaluru/2017/jun/27/karnataka-plans-to-develop-government-schools-with-help-of-alumni-network-1621225.html

It is an initiative taken by the Karnataka State Commission for Protection of Child Rights, which is being implemented through the district administrations. According to the information available from the commission, all government schools in the state should have ‘alumni associations’ by July 16. 

Kripa Alva, chairperson of the commission said, “I have been personally visiting schools and also meeting officials concerned at district and taluk levels to implement it. We are aiming to complete the formation of associations within a month.”

During my visit to government schools, I got to know that some of them have been developed by their old students. Hence the idea of old students association at government schools struck my mind,” she added.Private schools in the state are already having alumni associations, which help in their development in every possible way.

“These associations hold annual events and support schools financially and morally. We are sure that alumni of respective government schools will also come forward to develop the schools in which they studied,” Alva said. 

How it will be conceptualised
The authorities of all 54,000 government schools will verify the admission registers of last 10 to 25 years. They will  identify the residential address of the students and will send them invitations regarding setting up of old students association. In each letter, the contact number of the head master or the teacher in-charge of the school will be mentioned. Later, an official inauguration of the association will be done, where all students will be invited.

 

 

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The application process for admission to LKG and Class I to Karnataka schools under Right to Education act will likely begin today. The process will be online and this time Aadhaar number has been made mandatory to eliminate any risk of duplication in the application process. The child must have an Aadhaar card or should have a valid Aadhaar enrollment number in order to apply under RTE. The government has also decided to give preference to children of farmers who have committed suicide. 

The Department of Public Instruction (DPI) decided to include the children of farmers who committed suicide in the list of disadvantaged category. This will help such children access to formal schooling. 

Aadhaar Card mandatory for application 

The Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan (SSA), Karnataka has also made Aadhaar number compulsory for children applying for RTE quota seats. The registration for RTE admisisons will not be completed without the Aadhaar number or Aadhaar enrollment number. The inclusion of Aadhaar number will simplify the process of verification.

The application process is expected to begin today for 1.3 lakh seats for LKG and class I students at private-aided schools. The application process is expected to end on March 31. Currently the official website of Department of Public Instruction (DPI) for school education in Karnataka hosts the trial link for application process.The DPI also has decided to address the problems and grievances of parents this year and has provided a link on the official website in this regard. DPI has alos activated a link on the website for pincode based locality and school search for RTE admission 2017. 

The DPI also has decided to address the problems and grievances of parents this year and has provided a link on the official website in this regard. DPI has alos activated a link on the website for pincode based locality and school search for RTE admission 2017

 

 

 

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Bengaluru: Chief minister Siddaramaiah on Thursday launched a special admission drive under the Right to Education Act for dropouts and those who have passed class 5. The drive will continue till June 30. The education department will enroll under the student tracking system -it will keep tabs on students going to school through a unique ID given to them or Aaadhar number.

http://epaperbeta.timesofindia.com/Article.aspx?eid=31806&articlexml=FLAT-CLASSROOMS-TRACKING-RTE-Govt-launches-one-month-02062017006011

All students will be given a bicycle, free textbooks and uniform, besides an incentive of Rs 7,500 for those who have scored 60% marks in SSLC and Rs 15,000 for 80% marks.

As many as 419 schools will be up graded across the state; all will have a special English course and classes for maths, English and science for economically weaker sections.

 

 

 

 

 

 
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Digital literacy, ethics for today’s teens

The worlwide net offers plethora of knowledge for

Media and Technology have become an integral part of our adolescents' lives. They provide incredible opportunities to communicate, create, gather information, entertain themselves and even build business. However, if digital media is not used judiciously, it can become a weapon that can destroy the teen's world. Hence digital literacy and ethics are extremely essential to keep them safe.

http://bangaloremirror.indiatimes.com/columns/teen-spirit//articleshow/51227997.cms?

The worlwide net offers plethora of knowledge for children, but it's important to educate teens on cyber ethics, writes Dr Anuradha HS


What's digital literacy

Digital literacy is about having the skills to access, understand, question, critically analyze and evaluate online content. (Source: http://raisingchildren.net.au/). Digital ethics means not using technology to cheat.


Why is it important

Becoming digitally literate helps the teen to use the internet properly, developing a critical eye for accurate information and respect for other people's creative work. Most schools use technology effectively to educate students, administer tests, quizzes and give homework assignments. Educators can foster digital literacy skills among students in many ways. By using these skills, students can develop higher level of creative and critical thinking. The teachers become facilitators rather than sole experts. This also aids professional development of teachers. The teens become resilient and self-reliant, learn decision making and engage positively with technology. here is what a parent should teach their teens:


»Spot unreliable websites. Check the domain. Reliable ones are those that end as edu representing an educational institution, .gov represents a governmental organization. Those ending with .com are commercial sites, .org or .ngo represents non-governmental organization and needs to be verified.
»Evaluate author and content. Look if the author is listed and whether he/she is an expert
»Ensure that the content is current and accurate. See whether what has been expressed is a fact or an opinion.
»Follow the rules of digital ethics like avoiding use of pirated software, using content legally i.e. following copyright laws and also avoiding plagiarism.
»Teens need to understand the concept of digital cheating namely, texting answers, taking pictures of assignments and quizzes and copying and pasting other people's work.
A good digital citizen will keep in mind the following: (Source http://mediasmarts.ca/digital-media-literacy-fundamentals/digital-literacy-fundamentals) »Understand broader issues related to technology
»Understand rights and responsibilities
»Use technology in a positive and meaningful way
»Use technology to participate in educational, cultural and economic activities
»Promote civility and respect online
»Apply critical thinking skills while evaluating internet sources.

Teens are the digital citizens of tomorrow. Educators and parents have the responsibility of building the adolescent's character. This also holds well in the online world. Every teen need to follow the principle — treat others the way you yourself wish to be treated, whether you are offline or online.<!-- 257082 1 -->

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Group of volunteers hope to transform school for children from migrant families

Photo credit: Bangalore Mirror 

Mentor India, a volunteer-run platform designed for student empowerment -- especially in government schools -- has now adopted the Brindavan Tent School near Malleshpalya in Bengaluru.

Jaideep Rao, founder Mentor India and alumnus Manipal Institute of Technology, Manipal University told Bangalore Mirror that Mentor India was a part of KnowYourStar- a website run by a group of journalism enthusiasts- most of them techies. It focuses on profiling achievers from various disciplines.

Jaideep, who was in Mangaluru recently, said each class, from I-V- has 50 students each at the Brindavan Tent School for migrant kids. “These are mostly children of daily wage workers and we intend to work with them throughout the year. Through activity-based learning, we will focus mainly on English and confidence building. We started working in this school from this academic year. Hygiene too will be taught through games and activities. We have to start from the basics, including how to wear a proper uniform, have a good haircut, taking bath daily and so on. Our aim is to turn the place around in a year for which we are looking for volunteers,” he said.

He told BM about the challenges the school faces. “Our priority will be to change the ‘I can’t’ mindset that has resulted in low self -confidence. The class room conditions too have to be improved. Students from Class I-V sit in one room. We plan to change the environment and so that children look forward to being there. We have to remember that these are migrant kids and most of them are first-time learners in their families.” He said the team has set certain goals. They are going to focus on changing the classroom set up by making it more child-friendly and with an aim to build a one-on-one friendship with the children this month, he said. “Next month, the team will start off with English curriculum and also start working on their confidence building,” Jaideep said. He was upset on seeing the conditions of the school that is located not far from the city. Teacher Sarala has been with the school for 10 years and has extended support to this programme. The core team includes Anjali Alappat, Pranita Bhat and Nandini Nelson.


Volunteers needed

Jaideep said, “We need volunteers to come in and just be there for the kids. We are not looking for monetary assistance. I strongly feel that we can only gift time to the kids. We also do lot of volunteer events such as Volunesia. The aim is to make it a model school- one that is not looked down just because it is a school for children from migrant families.”

What is Mentor India?

Mentor India is a platform that exposes students to basic reading and comprehension of English, problem-solving skills, interpersonal skills, spoken English, empathetic skills and help them improve their personality through innovative thinking, listening to stories of role models and getting exposure to new perspectives. The in-house curriculum has been compiled in a workbook called ‘Mitra Pustak’.


Weekly meet at Cubbon Park

Volunesia is an attempt at creating something out of nothing. The volunteers who meet at Cubbon Park every Saturday use waste, recycled and given away material, collected by volunteers, to create handmade personalised goodies. These goodies are gifted to the students, mentors and teachers as part of the different activities under Mentor India.

By Deepthi Sanjiv

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