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Reverse trend: Pvt. school students flock to this government school

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reverse trend - test post

 

Alumni transform govt. school in Vijayapura village

The demand for private schools may have resulted in a sharp decline in the student strength of government schools across the State, but a government school in Vijayapura district has reversed the trend, thanks to its alumni.

Set up on the day the country got its independence, the Government Higher Primary School in Hanumasagar village of Vijayapura district, which had just 60 students a few months ago, has now added 112 more to its fold. The new students left their private schools to enrol here.... read more

 

posted Jul 13, 2017 by anonymous

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Source: The Hindu

The demand for private schools may have resulted in a sharp decline in the student strength of government schools across the State, but a government school in Vijayapura district has reversed the trend, thanks to its alumni.

Set up on the day the country got its independence, the Government Higher Primary School in Hanumasagar village of Vijayapura district, which had just 60 students a few months ago, has now added 112 more to its fold. The new students left their private schools to enrol here.

This “trend reversal” is the result of an initiative by five former students who were pained over the dwindling student strength in their alma mater. “After passing out of school, five of us were serving as teachers in various government schools. When we came to know that our government school was gradually losing students to private schools, we decided to do whatever possible to break the trend,” said G.S. Jamkhandi.

Explaining the methods they adopted, he said that last summer vacation, the five of them, with the permission of the Block Education Officer, held special coaching classes in the school. “We deputed three teachers to teach mathematics, science and English. Our efforts yielded results, as the parents agreed to shift their children who were studying in private schools in three nearby villages,” he said.

Abdul Nadaf, father of Afreen Nadaf studying in standard six, said that after the teachers held meetings and training sessions, he was confident that his daughter would get better education in the government school. “I paid ₹10,000 as fee in the private school. Now, in the government school, besides quality education, I have been able to save money and there are various facilities such as mid-day meals, bicycles and free uniform,” he said. Afreen is elated too: “I was not happy in the private school. So was five of my cousins. After undergoing coaching, we decided to join this government school.”

Mathematics teacher Laksmi Hosamani said district in charge Minister M.B. Patil had assured of deputing three full-time teachers and arranging for bus service for students. He has also promised a grant of ₹10 lakh for renovation of the school and e-teaching facility.

+1 vote

Back to school: Students of Sharada Vidyanikethana Public School, Talapady, looking at The Hindu In School edition after its launching on Monday.  

The Hindu In School edition for the 2017-’18 academic year was launched at Sharada Vidyanikethana Public School here on Monday.

http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/Mangalore/this-years-the-hindu-in-school-launched/article18725287.ece

Releasing the new edition, Sushma Dinkar, principal, said the school has been cultivating among the students the habit of reading newspapers. Each room in the school’s hostel was being supplied with a newspaper.

Ms. Dinkar said the student’s edition should have the right mix of current affairs, stories, cartoons and articles that help students. G.R. Venkatesh, Regional General Manager, said The Hindu In School has been providing such content since its launch four years ago.

Ms. Dinkar and ten students launched the edition. Among the students who received the new edition was Advait, of Class 10, who started reading newspapers since joining the school three years ago.

Suhas, of Class 8, said he starts reading the newspaper from the sports pages everyday

 

 

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+2 votes

 

Express photo by Kamleshwar Singh

“My first thought was these children are not going to live long by picking food from the streets. But I did not know how to help them. I did not know much about Indian culture and everyone I spoke to dismissed these children as rag-pickers and thieves," he says.

http://indianexpress.com/article/india/how-a-monk-brought-children-out-of-slums-to-schools-lobsang-jamyang-dharamshala-4699506/

Varinder Bhatia | Dharamsala

In 1997, when Lobsang Jamyang escaped from Tibet and arrived in Dharamsala, the 24-year-old had two “goals in life”: to meet the Dalai Lama, which he did soon after arriving; and study religion, which he went on to do at Sera Jey monastery in Mundgod, Karnataka.

However, he says, it was only when he returned to Dharamsala in 2001 that he realised his second goal was farther away, that his religion had more to teach him. “Two children used to follow me as I went from my home to the monastery, wait for me outside all day, and follow me back, begging for a coin or something to eat,” says Lobsang. Then one day, in July that year, he saw the two foraging through a heap of garbage outside his one-room accommodation, looking for something to eat.

“My first thought was these children are not going to live long by picking food from the streets. But I did not know how to help them. I did not know much about Indian culture and everyone I spoke to dismissed these children as rag-pickers and thieves,” he says.

That was his big Buddhist moment. “My conscience pricked me. As a follower of His Holiness and a student of Buddhism, how could I allow such a thing to happen,” says the 44-year-old.

That’s how the monk, whose official status in India is that of a refugee, set up Tong Len Charitable Trust, which runs a residential set-up in Sarah village, some 15 km from Mcleodganj, with financial backing from the Dalai Lama. Today, there are 107 children, mainly ragpickers from the slums of Kangra Valley, who stay at Tong Len. For their schooling, the Trust has tied up with Dayanand Model Senior Secondary School.

Pinky, a 17-year-old, has just finished her higher secondary school with 75 per cent marks in the science stream. “I will be starting my coaching classes for my PMT (pre-medical test) exams. I want to be a doctor,” says Pinky. Both her parents are daily wagers.

Meenakshi Gautam, principal of Dayanand Model Senior Secondary School, says, “We are lucky to be part of this initiative. There are nearly 100 students from Tong Len who are with us.”

Lobsang says he used to pay parents Rs 150 every month to keep their children at Tong Len. “But as the numbers increased, we thought we should utilise the money to provide better facilities at Tong Len,” he says.

+1 vote

 

Aditi Gyanesh@timesgroup

Bengaluru:

Was Old Building Razed 11 Yrs Ago After Rain Damage. It's been six years since the new building for Subbaiah Reddy Higher Primary School in Jogupalya, Ulsoor, was completed but it is yet to be inaugurated. The 82 students from the school are still sharing classrooms with students of BBMP High School on Jogupalya Main Road.

http://epaperbeta.timesofindia.com/Article.aspx?eid=31806&articlexml=School-locked-since-2011-as-BBMP-fails-to-09062017003045

Eleven years ago, the old building was demolished after it was severely damaged following a downpour, and Bruhat Bengaluru Mahanagara Palike (BBMP) hired a contractor to construct a new building for the 70-yearold school. Initially, the contractor had locked the building as his bills were due. He has now handed over the keys to BBMP but the school is unused. The initial construction cost as per the tender was Rs 46 lakh, but the final cost touched Rs 98 crore.BBMP still owes the contractor Rs 36 lakh.

C Babu, the contractor, told TOI: “I have given them the keys to the building. If they don't pay my dues, I will move the court seeking a stay. I will not allow them to use it, and the children will also be moved out.“ BBMP special commissioner (education) S G Raveendra said: “It's a small matter (of payment). We have inspected the building and will be opening it soon for children. The date is yet to be decided.“

B R Chandran, who studied at the school in the 1960s, has been fighting for its reopening. “This is the only Kannada medium school for four wards,“ Chandran said.“Work on the building was completed by 2011, but the school was not opened.“ Chandran has written to a number of BBMP officials over the years, including mayor G Padmavathi. During an inspection, Padmavathi had said the school would be opened on May 29 but it has not happened. “The building is beautiful. We just want students to get an education,“ said Chandran.

 

 

 

 

 

+1 vote

To curb charging of "unreasonable" fees and levying of "hidden" costs, the CBSE has sought data from private schools about their fee structure and increase carried out in recent years.

http://www.deccanheraldepaper.com/

The move comes weeks after the Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) warned private schools against turning into "shops" by selling uniform and books on their premises.

"We have told the schools that they should not charge unreasonable fees. The charges should be reasonable and there should be no hidden costs as that is the more irritating part for the parents," Union HRD Minister Prakash Javadekar told PTI in an interview.

He said the CBSE has sought data from schools about their fee structure and increase in fees.

"Many schools have sent the data, which are being analyzed. Schools which haven't sent them, have been sent reminders and penalized," he said. The minister, however, did not throw light on the penalty measures for schools found guilty of overcharging and having hidden costs in their fee structure.

Overcharging by schools and increase in fees every year have been a subject of concern, often raised by parents

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