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Reverse trend: Pvt. school students flock to this government school

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Source: The Hindu

The demand for private schools may have resulted in a sharp decline in the student strength of government schools across the State, but a government school in Vijayapura district has reversed the trend, thanks to its alumni.

Set up on the day the country got its independence, the Government Higher Primary School in Hanumasagar village of Vijayapura district, which had just 60 students a few months ago, has now added 112 more to its fold. The new students left their private schools to enrol here.

This “trend reversal” is the result of an initiative by five former students who were pained over the dwindling student strength in their alma mater. “After passing out of school, five of us were serving as teachers in various government schools. When we came to know that our government school was gradually losing students to private schools, we decided to do whatever possible to break the trend,” said G.S. Jamkhandi.

Explaining the methods they adopted, he said that last summer vacation, the five of them, with the permission of the Block Education Officer, held special coaching classes in the school. “We deputed three teachers to teach mathematics, science and English. Our efforts yielded results, as the parents agreed to shift their children who were studying in private schools in three nearby villages,” he said.

Abdul Nadaf, father of Afreen Nadaf studying in standard six, said that after the teachers held meetings and training sessions, he was confident that his daughter would get better education in the government school. “I paid ₹10,000 as fee in the private school. Now, in the government school, besides quality education, I have been able to save money and there are various facilities such as mid-day meals, bicycles and free uniform,” he said. Afreen is elated too: “I was not happy in the private school. So was five of my cousins. After undergoing coaching, we decided to join this government school.”

Mathematics teacher Laksmi Hosamani said district in charge Minister M.B. Patil had assured of deputing three full-time teachers and arranging for bus service for students. He has also promised a grant of ₹10 lakh for renovation of the school and e-teaching facility.

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Firoz Rozindar VIJAYAPURA, JUNE 19, 2017 00:28 IST
UPDATED: JUNE 19, 2017 09:06 IST
posted Jun 27, 2017 by anonymous

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+2 votes

reverse trend - test post

 

Alumni transform govt. school in Vijayapura village

The demand for private schools may have resulted in a sharp decline in the student strength of government schools across the State, but a government school in Vijayapura district has reversed the trend, thanks to its alumni.

Set up on the day the country got its independence, the Government Higher Primary School in Hanumasagar village of Vijayapura district, which had just 60 students a few months ago, has now added 112 more to its fold. The new students left their private schools to enrol here.... read more

 

+2 votes

Picture Credits:DC

Bengaluru: The transformation of a government school which had hardly 70 students in the rolls to a school now aspired by many is the face-changing story of Government V.K.O School at Shivajinagar.

With over 100 years of history, the school that was officially inaugurated after a revamp worth Rs 16 crore, now as applicants streaming in, even days after the start of the new academic year.

The school now has more than 1500 students. “It was totally overwhelming that 7,900 students approached us for admissions this year out of which 1,569 were admitted,” said Syed Athar Pasha, acting Principal and Administrative Advisor.

Formerly known as V.K. Obaidulla Govt Urdu School, the institution at present offers education in various mediums including English, Urdu, and Kannada. “Students from the sixth grade and above are given two options to chose from – English and Kannada. From high school level, each student can pick up Urdu or Hindi as the third language, English and Kannada being the first two respectively,” Pasha explained.

 With 42 smart class rooms, lab facilities, library, recreational rooms and dining halls spread across four floors at the campus, a visit to the school would make one relook at the stereotype of  a government school. Sixty new teachers were hired this year to the existing 24 appointed by the government.The revamp was done by I Monetary Advisory Council (IMA), the charitable wing of IMA group. Speaking to Deccan Chronicle, Mohammed Mansoor Khan, President of the Advisory Council affirms that the council seeks to provide facilities to the needy as its primary objective since its inception.

“The school which is located at a key area in the city with a populous community residing around was not up to the standard. With demand for quality education on the rise, a complete makeover was necessary for the survival of the institution.” He also attributes the basic thought behind taking up the project to state minister R. Roshan Baig, who is also an alumnus of the school.

The school is under constant surveillance with a total of 126 CCTV installed at various points, including classrooms. The school administration has also developed a smart phone application through which parents can monitor the developments of their wards at the campus.

Nearby residents are elated with revamped school and are keen to seek admission for their wards. “It is a blessing that a school with such facilities have started working in our area. If not this year, I’ll apply earlier next year to ensure my son gets a seat here,” said Majeed Salam, a parent. The renovated institution was officially inaugurated recently by CM Siddaramaiah.

Number of Students
463 – Kindergarten
572 – Lower Primary
354 – Upper Primary
180 – High-School
1569 – Total

 

+2 votes

                                                       

Photosource  Deccan Heraldd         Image for Representation

There is just one child available for every nine adoptive parents in India waiting to take a child home

http://www.deccanherald.com/content/619534/only-1766-children-15200-adoptive.html

As of May 2017, there were 15,200 prospective adoptive parents (PAPs) while child care institutions (CCIs) have only 1,766 children in their care across the country. Of these, 1,279 are children with special needs, according to CARINGS, the Child Adoption Resource Information and Guidance System.

"About 70-80 percent of PAPs want healthy normal children below the age of two years. That means around 10,000 parents want to adopt the 59 children in the age group available with child care institutions across the country. The discourse around adoptions in this country needs to change," said Avinash Kumar of Families of Joy, a non-profit consisting of a group of adoptive families.

Kumar is also a member of Child Adoption Resource Authority's (CARA) steering committee.

Of the 1,766 children currently available for adoption, only 59 are below two years of age, the most preferred age group for Indian PAPs; 339 are normal children above the age of two years, 89 are siblings and 1,279 are children with special needs.

The CARINGS data, collated by Families of Joy, says state wise figures also reflect the national trend.

With around 155 children over the age of two and around 10 below two, Orissa tops the list of states with maximum adoptable children. Maharashtra has 20 children below two and 298 above two years, while Andhra Pradesh has around two children below two years and 148 above the age of two.

"We did a process of immediate placements for hard to place children -- older children and children having minor ailments or corrective diseases. We managed to place 300 of them. Every year, only 30-35 special needs children are placed with Indian PAPs, but most such adoptions take place inter- country," CARA chairperson Deepak Kumar told PTI.
Official CARA adoption statistics show that while the number of Indian adults registered with the agency has more than doubled in under a year -- from 7,000 last July to 15,200 this May -- the number of adoptions has steadily dipped.

According to figures available on the CARA website, there were 5,964 in-country adoptions between January 2011 to March 2012 and only 3,210 from April 2016 to March 2017.

Officials explain this dip saying that adoption figures are dwindling globally because of a variety of reasons such as birth control being more widely used and there being less of a taboo against unwed mothers. Both these trends result in fewer babies being abandoned or surrendered for adoption, which in turn leads to fewer adoptions.

Explaining the fewer number of children available for adoption, Ian Anand Forber Pratt, director, Children's Emergency Relief International, says most "orphans" living in CCIs are not "orphans".

"These children have families and they continue to stay in orphanages because there is no effort to strengthen the family structure or reintegrate them with their families. If the CCI cannot send them back to their families then they should consider family based child care options, including adoption," he said

 

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+1 vote

Source: New Indian Express

BENGALURU: BMTC’s smart card passes are facing some teething troubles and this is causing inconvenience to students. Many students complain that they are forced to skip classes to get the smart card passes as the counters issuing these are closed on Sundays and general holidays. On Saturdays, long queues are seen in front of the counters as issuing a single smart card takes around 20 minutes.

While BMTC claims that they are issuing passes from 6.30am to 9pm at major bus stations, including Majestic, students say that most counters are functioning only between 8am and 5pm.

Aravind V, a college student who came to get a smart card from Majestic bus terminus, said: “On Saturday, I was standing in a queue from 12pm to 3pm. Later, they stopped issuing smart card passes and asked us to come the next day. So I skipped my classes on Wednesday to get the pass. I cannot afford regular tickets because it is expensive.”

Some students complain that there was delay in issuing passes this year. BMTC started issuing smart card passes only from June 17. “BMTC should either issue passes from June first week or set up counters at respective educational institutions. Some staffers are also very rude when we ask them to clear our doubts,” said Reshma S, another student.

There are also complaints that some BMTC bus conductors claim that electronic ticketing machines are dysfunctional or unavailable, forcing the students to buy regular tickets. However, some conductors are now allowing students to travel after they produce the new smart card.
Also, some students say that the pass forms downloaded from the BMTC website are not being accepted at the counters.

When contacted, a senior BMTC official said they are launching the smart cards for students for the first time. “There are some delays and technical issues since it is the first of its kind. But we will look into these issues and sort it out shortly. We are issuing smart cards at 35 counters across the city for the benefit of the students.”

+2 votes

Source: TOI

BENGALURU: After a 10-year stint in the corporate sector, Ashish Rajpal quit his job to work in education. Disillusionment with the nonprofit sector and a left-liberal upbringing inspired him to improve the quality of education in India. The idea led to the birth of XSEED in 2008, a company which is transforming the way 10 lakh children in 3,000 schools, including 296 schools in Karnataka and 100 in Bengaluru, are taught by 75,000 teachers.
The company provides a comprehensive teaching toolkit to English-medium schools. In an interview with TOI, Ashish spoke about the need to move away from rote learning and more. Excerpts:
Considering that our education system is largely based on rote learning, how disadvantaged are Indian children compared to kids elsewhere?
I once asked a professor from the University of Pennsylvania the same thing and he told me, `Indian students are great at answering questions but don't know how to ask the right ones.' We are trying to prepare children for the 21st century and make them capable of understanding, communicating and questioning. Instead of learning by rote, we want them to have a dialogue with their teachers. Children in other countries are more used to learning by doing things on their own and voicing their opinions.
You've called yourself an `elementary school in a box'. Explain We believed that the problem of access was more or less solved. We wanted to work on quality control using the existing infrastructure.We provide teacher training, textbooks, question banks for internal exams, an evaluation system as well as a curriculum. We are one of the largest school book publishers in the country and work within the structures of CBSE, ICSE and state boards. We have prepared lesson plans for teachers to tackle any topic from kindergarten to class 8. Teachers have told us how their students now ask more questions and are more confident and open-minded.
How does your company reach out to so many children?
It has been a long journey . When we went to schools in Delhi and Uttar Pradesh, it was an uphill task to convince the principal that we were offering something for a reasonable one-time payment which would benefit them for years. We have 100 education coaches who have about 30 schools under them which they visit once in six weeks to give the teachers a refresher course. Our presence is most widespread in Tamil Nadu, with 2.50 lakh kids in 800 schools.
How much do you spend per student?
There is a reason why we have not expanded to higher grades. We want to focus on building a strong foundation for students. We considered there may be a clash between the learning provided in higher classes and the way students are evaluated (by boards). The programme costs us Rs750-Rs1,500 per student. In eight years, we have rebooted our model thrice to be up to date with the latest trends and teaching methods. MIT studied our company while working on social entrepreneurs.

How widespread is the initiative in other countries?

We focus on other developing countries as they face similar problems.We provide services to schools in Saudi Arabia, UAE, Nepal, Bhutan and Philippines among others. The initiative has been remarkably successful in Philippines.
Have you collaborated with any state governments so far?
We tried but it is hard to engage with governments. You spend time building a rapport to get them on board but they may change their mind.Such initiatives require long-term implementation and cooperation.

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