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Inter-school cricket tourneys

+1 vote

The Karnataka State Cricket Association (KSCA) Cup (under-16) and the BT Ramaiah Shield (under-14) will begin from the first week of July.

Interested schools can send their entries on or before June 29.

For details contact the KSCA office on 080-22863298 or 080-40154015.



Deccan Herald
posted Jun 21, 2017 by anonymous

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+2 votes

Picture Credits:DC

Bengaluru: The transformation of a government school which had hardly 70 students in the rolls to a school now aspired by many is the face-changing story of Government V.K.O School at Shivajinagar.

With over 100 years of history, the school that was officially inaugurated after a revamp worth Rs 16 crore, now as applicants streaming in, even days after the start of the new academic year.

The school now has more than 1500 students. “It was totally overwhelming that 7,900 students approached us for admissions this year out of which 1,569 were admitted,” said Syed Athar Pasha, acting Principal and Administrative Advisor.

Formerly known as V.K. Obaidulla Govt Urdu School, the institution at present offers education in various mediums including English, Urdu, and Kannada. “Students from the sixth grade and above are given two options to chose from – English and Kannada. From high school level, each student can pick up Urdu or Hindi as the third language, English and Kannada being the first two respectively,” Pasha explained.

 With 42 smart class rooms, lab facilities, library, recreational rooms and dining halls spread across four floors at the campus, a visit to the school would make one relook at the stereotype of  a government school. Sixty new teachers were hired this year to the existing 24 appointed by the government.The revamp was done by I Monetary Advisory Council (IMA), the charitable wing of IMA group. Speaking to Deccan Chronicle, Mohammed Mansoor Khan, President of the Advisory Council affirms that the council seeks to provide facilities to the needy as its primary objective since its inception.

“The school which is located at a key area in the city with a populous community residing around was not up to the standard. With demand for quality education on the rise, a complete makeover was necessary for the survival of the institution.” He also attributes the basic thought behind taking up the project to state minister R. Roshan Baig, who is also an alumnus of the school.

The school is under constant surveillance with a total of 126 CCTV installed at various points, including classrooms. The school administration has also developed a smart phone application through which parents can monitor the developments of their wards at the campus.

Nearby residents are elated with revamped school and are keen to seek admission for their wards. “It is a blessing that a school with such facilities have started working in our area. If not this year, I’ll apply earlier next year to ensure my son gets a seat here,” said Majeed Salam, a parent. The renovated institution was officially inaugurated recently by CM Siddaramaiah.

Number of Students
463 – Kindergarten
572 – Lower Primary
354 – Upper Primary
180 – High-School
1569 – Total


+1 vote

Due to the negligence of the elected representatives, the Government Higher Primary School in Mogra has been facing a threat of closure, as the number of admissions is depleting year after year. 

The school lacks connectivity with the other side of the stream, and students coming from the other side have to cross the stream using a locally made foot bridge to reach the school, and the administration has not done anything for the safety, or transportation of students.

The school is 94 year-old and thousands of children had studied here over the years. There are 30 students from class one to seven in the school. Around 20 students who come from other side of the stream, have to cross the stream to reach the school. 

Risky during rains
This becomes risky during heavy rains, as the stream will be in full spate. Due to the problem, the admission has been dwindling year to year. Though it is expected that the parent assist their wards, it could not be materialised. 

Most students are from SC/ST communities. During heavy rains, parents have no choice but to avoid sending their wards to school. 

The locals have made a footbridge using acera tree logs, but it has grown weak. The school is not linked with any main road, and the school also lacks basic facilities. There are no mobile signals in the region, making it difficult for the parents and the school staff to communicate even during emergencies.

Lokesh Subrahmanya said that it has been a cumbersome task to transport LPG cylinder to the school. Many a times, SDMC members carry the cylinder, or else the teachers themselves have to carry it to the school. 

Owing to the negligence of the administration and elected representatives, the school is facing the threat of closure, said the villagers.

+2 votes


Express photo by Kamleshwar Singh

“My first thought was these children are not going to live long by picking food from the streets. But I did not know how to help them. I did not know much about Indian culture and everyone I spoke to dismissed these children as rag-pickers and thieves," he says.

Varinder Bhatia | Dharamsala

In 1997, when Lobsang Jamyang escaped from Tibet and arrived in Dharamsala, the 24-year-old had two “goals in life”: to meet the Dalai Lama, which he did soon after arriving; and study religion, which he went on to do at Sera Jey monastery in Mundgod, Karnataka.

However, he says, it was only when he returned to Dharamsala in 2001 that he realised his second goal was farther away, that his religion had more to teach him. “Two children used to follow me as I went from my home to the monastery, wait for me outside all day, and follow me back, begging for a coin or something to eat,” says Lobsang. Then one day, in July that year, he saw the two foraging through a heap of garbage outside his one-room accommodation, looking for something to eat.

“My first thought was these children are not going to live long by picking food from the streets. But I did not know how to help them. I did not know much about Indian culture and everyone I spoke to dismissed these children as rag-pickers and thieves,” he says.

That was his big Buddhist moment. “My conscience pricked me. As a follower of His Holiness and a student of Buddhism, how could I allow such a thing to happen,” says the 44-year-old.

That’s how the monk, whose official status in India is that of a refugee, set up Tong Len Charitable Trust, which runs a residential set-up in Sarah village, some 15 km from Mcleodganj, with financial backing from the Dalai Lama. Today, there are 107 children, mainly ragpickers from the slums of Kangra Valley, who stay at Tong Len. For their schooling, the Trust has tied up with Dayanand Model Senior Secondary School.

Pinky, a 17-year-old, has just finished her higher secondary school with 75 per cent marks in the science stream. “I will be starting my coaching classes for my PMT (pre-medical test) exams. I want to be a doctor,” says Pinky. Both her parents are daily wagers.

Meenakshi Gautam, principal of Dayanand Model Senior Secondary School, says, “We are lucky to be part of this initiative. There are nearly 100 students from Tong Len who are with us.”

Lobsang says he used to pay parents Rs 150 every month to keep their children at Tong Len. “But as the numbers increased, we thought we should utilise the money to provide better facilities at Tong Len,” he says.

+1 vote


Aditi Gyanesh@timesgroup


Was Old Building Razed 11 Yrs Ago After Rain Damage. It's been six years since the new building for Subbaiah Reddy Higher Primary School in Jogupalya, Ulsoor, was completed but it is yet to be inaugurated. The 82 students from the school are still sharing classrooms with students of BBMP High School on Jogupalya Main Road.

Eleven years ago, the old building was demolished after it was severely damaged following a downpour, and Bruhat Bengaluru Mahanagara Palike (BBMP) hired a contractor to construct a new building for the 70-yearold school. Initially, the contractor had locked the building as his bills were due. He has now handed over the keys to BBMP but the school is unused. The initial construction cost as per the tender was Rs 46 lakh, but the final cost touched Rs 98 crore.BBMP still owes the contractor Rs 36 lakh.

C Babu, the contractor, told TOI: “I have given them the keys to the building. If they don't pay my dues, I will move the court seeking a stay. I will not allow them to use it, and the children will also be moved out.“ BBMP special commissioner (education) S G Raveendra said: “It's a small matter (of payment). We have inspected the building and will be opening it soon for children. The date is yet to be decided.“

B R Chandran, who studied at the school in the 1960s, has been fighting for its reopening. “This is the only Kannada medium school for four wards,“ Chandran said.“Work on the building was completed by 2011, but the school was not opened.“ Chandran has written to a number of BBMP officials over the years, including mayor G Padmavathi. During an inspection, Padmavathi had said the school would be opened on May 29 but it has not happened. “The building is beautiful. We just want students to get an education,“ said Chandran.






+1 vote

Back to school: Students of Sharada Vidyanikethana Public School, Talapady, looking at The Hindu In School edition after its launching on Monday.  

The Hindu In School edition for the 2017-’18 academic year was launched at Sharada Vidyanikethana Public School here on Monday.

Releasing the new edition, Sushma Dinkar, principal, said the school has been cultivating among the students the habit of reading newspapers. Each room in the school’s hostel was being supplied with a newspaper.

Ms. Dinkar said the student’s edition should have the right mix of current affairs, stories, cartoons and articles that help students. G.R. Venkatesh, Regional General Manager, said The Hindu In School has been providing such content since its launch four years ago.

Ms. Dinkar and ten students launched the edition. Among the students who received the new edition was Advait, of Class 10, who started reading newspapers since joining the school three years ago.

Suhas, of Class 8, said he starts reading the newspaper from the sports pages everyday