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Educate children and make them pillars of society, says judge

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Sadanand Nayak, Principal District and Sessions Judge, inaugurating an awareness jatha in Yadgir on Thursday.

Sadanand S. Nayak, Principal District and Sessions Judge, said on Thursday that it was every citizen’s duty to prevent child marriage. He asked law enforcement agencies to ensure action is taken against those responsible for child marriages.

Jatha taken out against child marriage

http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-national/tp-karnataka/educate-children-and-make-them-pillars-of-society-says-judge/article19079124.ece

He was addressing a gathering after inaugurating an awareness jatha titled ‘Prevention of Child Marriage and Shale Kade Nanna Nade’, jointly organised by the district administration, the zilla panchayat, the District Legal Services Authority, the District Bar Association and others.

Urging parents not to marry off their minor children, Mr. Nayak said that performing a child marriage was an offence under the law. “Educate your children, make them pillars of the society,” he said.

Deputy Commissioner Khushboo Goel Chowdhary and zilla panchayat CEO Avinash Menon Rajendran released booklets and pamphlets on the theme. Sharanappa Patil, deputy director of the Department of Women and Child Development, were present.

 

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Jatha taken out against child marriage , Yadgir, Karnataka
posted Jun 19, 2017 by anonymous

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+2 votes

 

Photo credit - google.co.in

Shankar and Seema were working as child labourers to support their families but today they feel empowered as they work for the cause of deprived children.

Ranjith Kandya, Mysuru, DH News Service

http://www.deccanherald.com/content/617036/robbed-childhood-their-labour-love.html

The two, both aged 17, are members of ‘It’s Time to Talk - Children’s Views on Children’s Work’. As members of the campaign they visit various places across the country including New Delhi to create awareness about child labour and other issues pertaining to children. The campaign has members from 37 countries and aims to support the voice of working children from different contexts and facilitate it to be heard and considered in local, national and global meetings on child labour.

Sabeena says every child has a dream and having been a child labour herself, she is aware of the plight of such children. “Being a victim of child labour myself, it’s my duty to create awareness about the ill-effects of child labour. Education is the key to eradicate the social evil and governments should provide free and compulsory education till students complete II PUC,” she says.

While Sabeena was working in an incense manufacturing unit in Mysuru, Shankar was a flower vendor. Sabeena discontinued school when she was pursuing class V to support her family. Similarly, Shankar had to give up studies after his parents died.

Thanks to the city-based Rural Literacy and Health Programme (RLHP), an organisation working for deprived children, the two got a chance to become a part of mainstream society.

Shankar and Sabeena Banu, who were once school dropouts and child labourers, are now members of ‘It’s Time to Talk’, an international agency which campaigns against child labour.

Sabeena says that when she was working in the incense unit, a few volunteers of the RLHP noticed her and made all necessary arrangements to continue her education. “My mother was the breadwinner for the family. When I was in Class V, we faced severe hardships and thus I started working. I had to then give up my dreams of getting an education,” she says. Sabeena has now completed first PUC and has also completed basic courses in spoken English and computers.

Shankar says that members of the RLHP contacted him and took him along with them during one of their field visits. “I was admitted to Asha Kiran, a shelter house for boys, and I started going to school. I completed SSLC and applied for ITI,” he said. Shankar is also trained in organic farming and is well aware of farming methods.

 

+1 vote

Its something usual when children cry at first day at school, but that's even more cute when the children find their friends and stop crying and start playing. Children newly admitted to school are in tears ahead of the prayer session at a school which re-opened after the summer vacation in Bengaluru on Monday.

+1 vote

Friends celebrate with Ashwin Rao, who scored 99.4% in ICSE examinations, on Monday. He is the student of St Paul's English School, JP Nagar, Bengaluru. DH Photo

Bengaluru: Ashwin Rao, a student of St Paul's English School, is on cloud nine.

Flanked by his parents and grandparents, he cannot stop smiling. With a score of 99.4%, he has surpassed last year's topper Abhineet Parichha from Odisha. Ashwin has company for the first rank, sharing it with Pune's Muskan Abdullah Pathan.

http://www.deccanheraldepaper.com/

His father Dwarka Rao feels it was the hard work and a little luck that helped Ashwin achieve the feat. "We were expecting 96% to 98%, but it was basically his expectations that he needed to meet. He never attended tuitions and was very focused about his exams. Various school activities helped, as it gave him some time off," said Rao, who works with automotive giant Fiat-Chrysler.

Ashwin says he gave time to all subjects, but focused on the subjects he liked. "Computer Science and Maths are my favorite subjects, so I spent a lot of time on them. I like Computer Science so much that I even wrote a Java program for tic-tac-toe during my holidays." His mother Lakshmi Rao said Ashwin holds a red belt in Kung-fu and feels he is naturally gifted to handle studies and extracurricular activities with equal aplomb. "He exceeded all expectations and we are on the moon."

Dwarka Rao, Father of Ashwin Rao: He never attended tuitions and was very focused about his exams. School activities helped, giving him some time off.

 

+2 votes

 

Express photo by Kamleshwar Singh

“My first thought was these children are not going to live long by picking food from the streets. But I did not know how to help them. I did not know much about Indian culture and everyone I spoke to dismissed these children as rag-pickers and thieves," he says.

http://indianexpress.com/article/india/how-a-monk-brought-children-out-of-slums-to-schools-lobsang-jamyang-dharamshala-4699506/

Varinder Bhatia | Dharamsala

In 1997, when Lobsang Jamyang escaped from Tibet and arrived in Dharamsala, the 24-year-old had two “goals in life”: to meet the Dalai Lama, which he did soon after arriving; and study religion, which he went on to do at Sera Jey monastery in Mundgod, Karnataka.

However, he says, it was only when he returned to Dharamsala in 2001 that he realised his second goal was farther away, that his religion had more to teach him. “Two children used to follow me as I went from my home to the monastery, wait for me outside all day, and follow me back, begging for a coin or something to eat,” says Lobsang. Then one day, in July that year, he saw the two foraging through a heap of garbage outside his one-room accommodation, looking for something to eat.

“My first thought was these children are not going to live long by picking food from the streets. But I did not know how to help them. I did not know much about Indian culture and everyone I spoke to dismissed these children as rag-pickers and thieves,” he says.

That was his big Buddhist moment. “My conscience pricked me. As a follower of His Holiness and a student of Buddhism, how could I allow such a thing to happen,” says the 44-year-old.

That’s how the monk, whose official status in India is that of a refugee, set up Tong Len Charitable Trust, which runs a residential set-up in Sarah village, some 15 km from Mcleodganj, with financial backing from the Dalai Lama. Today, there are 107 children, mainly ragpickers from the slums of Kangra Valley, who stay at Tong Len. For their schooling, the Trust has tied up with Dayanand Model Senior Secondary School.

Pinky, a 17-year-old, has just finished her higher secondary school with 75 per cent marks in the science stream. “I will be starting my coaching classes for my PMT (pre-medical test) exams. I want to be a doctor,” says Pinky. Both her parents are daily wagers.

Meenakshi Gautam, principal of Dayanand Model Senior Secondary School, says, “We are lucky to be part of this initiative. There are nearly 100 students from Tong Len who are with us.”

Lobsang says he used to pay parents Rs 150 every month to keep their children at Tong Len. “But as the numbers increased, we thought we should utilise the money to provide better facilities at Tong Len,” he says.

+1 vote

For the 12th consecutive year, Anand Shiksha Kendra, Sarjapur Road, achieved 100% pass results. In all, five of 40 students secured a CGPA 10 and eight students CGPA 9 and above.

http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-in-school/cbse-a-record-number-of-children-bag-10-cgpa-a1-grades/article18869889.ece

At Siddaganga Public School in Chandra Layout, 76 students appeared and 18 secured CGPA 10. In all, 30 students secured CGPA 9 and above.

In National Public School, Rajajinagar, 125 students appeared and the school achieved 100% pass results. In all, 40 students secured CGPA 10, while 51 secured CGPA 9 and above.

At National Hill View Public School, Rajarajeshwarinagar, 119 students appeared. In all, 32 students secured CGPA 10, while 76 CGPA of 9 and above.

All the 118 students of National Public School, Indiranagar, passed and 45 students secured CGPA 10. In all 46 students secured CGPA 9 and above.

Read more at : http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-in-school/cbse-a-record-number-of-children-bag-10-cgpa-a1-grades/article18869889.ece

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