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School locked since 2011 as BBMP fails to pay bills to contractor

+1 vote
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Aditi Gyanesh@timesgroup

Bengaluru:

Was Old Building Razed 11 Yrs Ago After Rain Damage. It's been six years since the new building for Subbaiah Reddy Higher Primary School in Jogupalya, Ulsoor, was completed but it is yet to be inaugurated. The 82 students from the school are still sharing classrooms with students of BBMP High School on Jogupalya Main Road.

http://epaperbeta.timesofindia.com/Article.aspx?eid=31806&articlexml=School-locked-since-2011-as-BBMP-fails-to-09062017003045

Eleven years ago, the old building was demolished after it was severely damaged following a downpour, and Bruhat Bengaluru Mahanagara Palike (BBMP) hired a contractor to construct a new building for the 70-yearold school. Initially, the contractor had locked the building as his bills were due. He has now handed over the keys to BBMP but the school is unused. The initial construction cost as per the tender was Rs 46 lakh, but the final cost touched Rs 98 crore.BBMP still owes the contractor Rs 36 lakh.

C Babu, the contractor, told TOI: “I have given them the keys to the building. If they don't pay my dues, I will move the court seeking a stay. I will not allow them to use it, and the children will also be moved out.“ BBMP special commissioner (education) S G Raveendra said: “It's a small matter (of payment). We have inspected the building and will be opening it soon for children. The date is yet to be decided.“

B R Chandran, who studied at the school in the 1960s, has been fighting for its reopening. “This is the only Kannada medium school for four wards,“ Chandran said.“Work on the building was completed by 2011, but the school was not opened.“ Chandran has written to a number of BBMP officials over the years, including mayor G Padmavathi. During an inspection, Padmavathi had said the school would be opened on May 29 but it has not happened. “The building is beautiful. We just want students to get an education,“ said Chandran.

 

 

 

 

 

posted Jun 9, 2017 by Krinz Kiran

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+1 vote

Proposal was announced in 2017-18 budget and ₹1.75 crore was earmarked for it.

Soon, all students enrolled in civic-run educational institutions across the city will have a health cover.                   The Bruhat Bengaluru Mahanagara Palike, which runs 151 institutions, is in talks with a few State-run insurance companies about providing health plus accident insurance cover to its 16,000-odd students.

http://www.thehindu.com/news/cities/bangalore/insurance-for-bbmp-school-students/article18522681.ece

According to senior BBMP officials, the proposal was announced in the 2017-18 budget and ₹1.75 crore was earmarked for the same.                                                                                                                                          “We have contacted a couple of insurance companies and sought quotes and a group discount. We will take a call based on the best offer received from these insurance companies,” the officials said.

Most of the students in the BBMP-run institutions belong to lower socio-economic groups and the insurance cover will benefit them greatly.

“Instead of the BBMP conducting health camps, the students can go to hospitals for treatment and claim the expense incurred,” an official said.

In this regard, the funds earmarked for education was hiked from ₹64 crore to ₹89 crore. The BBMP recently decided to provide ties and belts along with uniforms.

 

 

 
+2 votes

 

Express photo by Kamleshwar Singh

“My first thought was these children are not going to live long by picking food from the streets. But I did not know how to help them. I did not know much about Indian culture and everyone I spoke to dismissed these children as rag-pickers and thieves," he says.

http://indianexpress.com/article/india/how-a-monk-brought-children-out-of-slums-to-schools-lobsang-jamyang-dharamshala-4699506/

Varinder Bhatia | Dharamsala

In 1997, when Lobsang Jamyang escaped from Tibet and arrived in Dharamsala, the 24-year-old had two “goals in life”: to meet the Dalai Lama, which he did soon after arriving; and study religion, which he went on to do at Sera Jey monastery in Mundgod, Karnataka.

However, he says, it was only when he returned to Dharamsala in 2001 that he realised his second goal was farther away, that his religion had more to teach him. “Two children used to follow me as I went from my home to the monastery, wait for me outside all day, and follow me back, begging for a coin or something to eat,” says Lobsang. Then one day, in July that year, he saw the two foraging through a heap of garbage outside his one-room accommodation, looking for something to eat.

“My first thought was these children are not going to live long by picking food from the streets. But I did not know how to help them. I did not know much about Indian culture and everyone I spoke to dismissed these children as rag-pickers and thieves,” he says.

That was his big Buddhist moment. “My conscience pricked me. As a follower of His Holiness and a student of Buddhism, how could I allow such a thing to happen,” says the 44-year-old.

That’s how the monk, whose official status in India is that of a refugee, set up Tong Len Charitable Trust, which runs a residential set-up in Sarah village, some 15 km from Mcleodganj, with financial backing from the Dalai Lama. Today, there are 107 children, mainly ragpickers from the slums of Kangra Valley, who stay at Tong Len. For their schooling, the Trust has tied up with Dayanand Model Senior Secondary School.

Pinky, a 17-year-old, has just finished her higher secondary school with 75 per cent marks in the science stream. “I will be starting my coaching classes for my PMT (pre-medical test) exams. I want to be a doctor,” says Pinky. Both her parents are daily wagers.

Meenakshi Gautam, principal of Dayanand Model Senior Secondary School, says, “We are lucky to be part of this initiative. There are nearly 100 students from Tong Len who are with us.”

Lobsang says he used to pay parents Rs 150 every month to keep their children at Tong Len. “But as the numbers increased, we thought we should utilise the money to provide better facilities at Tong Len,” he says.

+1 vote

 

 

 

Digital literacy, ethics for today’s teens

The worlwide net offers plethora of knowledge for

Media and Technology have become an integral part of our adolescents' lives. They provide incredible opportunities to communicate, create, gather information, entertain themselves and even build business. However, if digital media is not used judiciously, it can become a weapon that can destroy the teen's world. Hence digital literacy and ethics are extremely essential to keep them safe.

http://bangaloremirror.indiatimes.com/columns/teen-spirit//articleshow/51227997.cms?

The worlwide net offers plethora of knowledge for children, but it's important to educate teens on cyber ethics, writes Dr Anuradha HS


What's digital literacy

Digital literacy is about having the skills to access, understand, question, critically analyze and evaluate online content. (Source: http://raisingchildren.net.au/). Digital ethics means not using technology to cheat.


Why is it important

Becoming digitally literate helps the teen to use the internet properly, developing a critical eye for accurate information and respect for other people's creative work. Most schools use technology effectively to educate students, administer tests, quizzes and give homework assignments. Educators can foster digital literacy skills among students in many ways. By using these skills, students can develop higher level of creative and critical thinking. The teachers become facilitators rather than sole experts. This also aids professional development of teachers. The teens become resilient and self-reliant, learn decision making and engage positively with technology. here is what a parent should teach their teens:


»Spot unreliable websites. Check the domain. Reliable ones are those that end as edu representing an educational institution, .gov represents a governmental organization. Those ending with .com are commercial sites, .org or .ngo represents non-governmental organization and needs to be verified.
»Evaluate author and content. Look if the author is listed and whether he/she is an expert
»Ensure that the content is current and accurate. See whether what has been expressed is a fact or an opinion.
»Follow the rules of digital ethics like avoiding use of pirated software, using content legally i.e. following copyright laws and also avoiding plagiarism.
»Teens need to understand the concept of digital cheating namely, texting answers, taking pictures of assignments and quizzes and copying and pasting other people's work.
A good digital citizen will keep in mind the following: (Source http://mediasmarts.ca/digital-media-literacy-fundamentals/digital-literacy-fundamentals) »Understand broader issues related to technology
»Understand rights and responsibilities
»Use technology in a positive and meaningful way
»Use technology to participate in educational, cultural and economic activities
»Promote civility and respect online
»Apply critical thinking skills while evaluating internet sources.

Teens are the digital citizens of tomorrow. Educators and parents have the responsibility of building the adolescent's character. This also holds well in the online world. Every teen need to follow the principle — treat others the way you yourself wish to be treated, whether you are offline or online.<!-- 257082 1 -->

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+1 vote

image

Source: http://www.schooleducation.kar.nic.in

BENGALURU: The education department’s school adoption programme is receiving good response with many individuals and companies coming forward to give a ‘make over’ to government schools.
As per the information available from the department of public instruction, every week they are getting at least three queries seeking information about school adoption. “It is not that the people who are inquiring want to adopt an entire school. Some want to do something for a government school by spending `50,000. In some cases, they are ready to give up to `10 lakh,” said an official.

The department has not set any limit for the contribution people can contribute whatever they want to. “Most queries we get are about construction of toilets and providing safe drinking water. The second highest queries is about renovation of buildings,” said an official.
The department re-launched the school adoption programme in September last year. Primary and Secondary Education Minister Tanveer Sait had invited interested people help rejuvenate government schools across the state and had asked officials to come up with a list of 5,000 schools which really needed a makeover.  

“A majority of donors are showing interest in improving government schools located in Bengaluru. Representatives from MNCs, private firms and old students unions have approached us for information. We need help for the schools which are outside the city too,” an official said.
Recently, VKO Government Urdu School in Shivajinagar was inaugurated after renovation.  The school now has infrastructure that is similar to any elite private school in the city.

+1 vote

The Karnataka State Cricket Association (KSCA) Cup (under-16) and the BT Ramaiah Shield (under-14) will begin from the first week of July.

Interested schools can send their entries on or before June 29.

For details contact the KSCA office on 080-22863298 or 080-40154015.

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