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Pre-school admission

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Shree Ramana Maharishi Academy for the Blind (SRMAB) has invited applications from blind children aged 4 and above, for free residential pre-school admission. The courses offered are skill development in computers, classical dance, classical music, etc.

For details call, 08026581076,026588045.

http://www.deccanheraldepaper.com/

posted Jun 6, 2017 by Krinz Kiran

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+2 votes

 

Express photo by Kamleshwar Singh

“My first thought was these children are not going to live long by picking food from the streets. But I did not know how to help them. I did not know much about Indian culture and everyone I spoke to dismissed these children as rag-pickers and thieves," he says.

http://indianexpress.com/article/india/how-a-monk-brought-children-out-of-slums-to-schools-lobsang-jamyang-dharamshala-4699506/

Varinder Bhatia | Dharamsala

In 1997, when Lobsang Jamyang escaped from Tibet and arrived in Dharamsala, the 24-year-old had two “goals in life”: to meet the Dalai Lama, which he did soon after arriving; and study religion, which he went on to do at Sera Jey monastery in Mundgod, Karnataka.

However, he says, it was only when he returned to Dharamsala in 2001 that he realised his second goal was farther away, that his religion had more to teach him. “Two children used to follow me as I went from my home to the monastery, wait for me outside all day, and follow me back, begging for a coin or something to eat,” says Lobsang. Then one day, in July that year, he saw the two foraging through a heap of garbage outside his one-room accommodation, looking for something to eat.

“My first thought was these children are not going to live long by picking food from the streets. But I did not know how to help them. I did not know much about Indian culture and everyone I spoke to dismissed these children as rag-pickers and thieves,” he says.

That was his big Buddhist moment. “My conscience pricked me. As a follower of His Holiness and a student of Buddhism, how could I allow such a thing to happen,” says the 44-year-old.

That’s how the monk, whose official status in India is that of a refugee, set up Tong Len Charitable Trust, which runs a residential set-up in Sarah village, some 15 km from Mcleodganj, with financial backing from the Dalai Lama. Today, there are 107 children, mainly ragpickers from the slums of Kangra Valley, who stay at Tong Len. For their schooling, the Trust has tied up with Dayanand Model Senior Secondary School.

Pinky, a 17-year-old, has just finished her higher secondary school with 75 per cent marks in the science stream. “I will be starting my coaching classes for my PMT (pre-medical test) exams. I want to be a doctor,” says Pinky. Both her parents are daily wagers.

Meenakshi Gautam, principal of Dayanand Model Senior Secondary School, says, “We are lucky to be part of this initiative. There are nearly 100 students from Tong Len who are with us.”

Lobsang says he used to pay parents Rs 150 every month to keep their children at Tong Len. “But as the numbers increased, we thought we should utilise the money to provide better facilities at Tong Len,” he says.

+1 vote

method Logical learners follow patterns, rules, order and categorisation of work. photo credit: sesame preschool

method Logical learners follow patterns, rules, order and categorisation of work. photo credit: sesame preschool

Meenakshi, mother to two curious twin girls, Ira and Isha, wanted to teach them about the animal kingdom. She brought a colourful picture book and sat with her daughters. As they went page by page, the girls discovered things about wild animals. While Ira continued exploring wildlife, Isha wandered off disinterestedly. 

Meenakshi noticed her disinterest, but continued engaging Ira with the book.
A few minutes later, she played The Lion King on TV. Hearing the roar of the lion, Isha came back running to the room. And then followed the long list of questions — where does a lion live, what does it eat, how does it sound? Meenakshi then learnt that each of her daughters learn differently.

Each child is different and has a learning style that is unique to his or her personality. Observing a child’s behaviour at an early age can indicate a likely learning style. Like in Meenakshi’s case, she realised that while Ira was attracted to the colourful picture book, Isha could relate to the interactive nature of the programme on TV. The comfort levels of children, their interaction with the environment and the interest exhibited are all indicative of what holds the child’s attention and what doesn’t. This ultimately helps in comprehending how a child learns.

To each her own
When children are unable to follow or cope with the conventional chalk and blackboard teaching methods, parents often classify them as ‘incapable’ or ‘not bright in studies’. However, it is critical to understand that each child learns differently. 

Howard Gardner’s Theory of Multiple Intelligences recognises the different intelligences that children respond to. These intelligences relate to a person’s unique aptitude and ways they may prefer to demonstrate their intellectual abilities. These are adopted in schools as different styles of learning, focusing on different aspects of a child’s personality. Whether it is through games, music or dance, a connection can be seen between what is understood and how it manifests:

Kinesthetic intelligence: This means an ability to understand things through bodily awareness, movement and touching. Learning is best grasped by these children when they engage in physical activities to understand the material.Visual learning intelligence: This is a style which is adopted by children who respond expressively to visual aids. They process information through print rich games, puzzles, pictures, drawings, images and multimedia. It’s important that preschools use multiple platforms like TV, board games and digital games to teach such learners.Verbal intelligence: Such learners respond to sounds and learn effectively by listening to multimedia programmes and hearing stories. They are more receptive to people speaking and are able to relate by talking as well. These children retain information because of their ability to effectively use language. Educators can take help of some floor games to build stories around the theme being taught.Logical intelligence: Logical learners follow patterns, rules, order and categorisation of work. Clear explanations which elaborate ‘how’, ‘what’ and ‘why’ keep them engaged and interested.
Intrapersonal intelligence: Intrapersonal learners have strong intuition, motivation and confidence in their abilities. They do their best work when they are in a quiet space with nobody else around to distract them. They are guided by their own models of work and have the capacity to understand themselves, their fears and motivations.
Interpersonal intelligence: A child who can relate to people, understand their emotions, respond sensitively and maintain relations in an easy manner has an interpersonal learning style. This is a child who works well in teams and is good, clear and straightforward in his or her interactions.

Rhythmic intelligence: Musical-rhythmic learners are sensitive to rhythm, music and sounds. Rhythmic learners have a skill in the performance, composition, and appreciation of musical patterns. They are often able to recognise structures and patterns from sounds and speech. This is the reason why most early education centres teach children through rhymes and music.
Naturalistic intelligence: Parents can identify if their child is a naturalistic learner by simply observing her or his affinity for the natural world. Naturalist learners enjoy observing animals, interacting with pets, exploring nature, gardening and hiking.


It is important to understand that, often, these intelligences overlap. It is also 
important to expose children to different styles of learning, even though it may be challenging for them. This will help them explore other ways of learning the same lesson. They must be empowered to learn differently when their suitable learning method is not available. Therefore, it is always advised to integrate multiple modalities to teach children. Another way to enhance learning is to focus on children’s area of interest.

Expose them to opportunities to become an expert in the area that they feel passionate about. Acknowledging their interests and talents tells you a lot about their learning style. There are several patterns of learning and the best that a caregiver can do is step observe what seems to be working for their child and help them build their strengths.

(The author is vice-president, Sesame Schoolhouse)

http://www.deccanherald.com/content/618627/your-childs-learning-style.html

+1 vote

The application process for admission to LKG and Class I to Karnataka schools under Right to Education act will likely begin today. The process will be online and this time Aadhaar number has been made mandatory to eliminate any risk of duplication in the application process. The child must have an Aadhaar card or should have a valid Aadhaar enrollment number in order to apply under RTE. The government has also decided to give preference to children of farmers who have committed suicide. 

The Department of Public Instruction (DPI) decided to include the children of farmers who committed suicide in the list of disadvantaged category. This will help such children access to formal schooling. 

Aadhaar Card mandatory for application 

The Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan (SSA), Karnataka has also made Aadhaar number compulsory for children applying for RTE quota seats. The registration for RTE admisisons will not be completed without the Aadhaar number or Aadhaar enrollment number. The inclusion of Aadhaar number will simplify the process of verification.

The application process is expected to begin today for 1.3 lakh seats for LKG and class I students at private-aided schools. The application process is expected to end on March 31. Currently the official website of Department of Public Instruction (DPI) for school education in Karnataka hosts the trial link for application process.The DPI also has decided to address the problems and grievances of parents this year and has provided a link on the official website in this regard. DPI has alos activated a link on the website for pincode based locality and school search for RTE admission 2017. 

The DPI also has decided to address the problems and grievances of parents this year and has provided a link on the official website in this regard. DPI has alos activated a link on the website for pincode based locality and school search for RTE admission 2017

 

 

 

+1 vote

        

Photo Source: World Economic Forum

By- Teresa Belton

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/09/being-bored-is-good-for-children-and-adults-this-is-why?utm_content=bufferb8f6b&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

From books, arts and sports classes to iPads and television, many parents do everything in their power to entertain and educate their children. But what would happen if children were just left to be bored from time to time? How would it affect their development?

I began to think about boredom and children when I was researching the influence of television on children’s storytelling in the 1990s. Surprised at the lack of imagination in many of the hundreds of stories I read by ten to 12 year-old children in five different Norfolk schools, I wondered if this might partly be an effect of TV viewing. Findings of earlier research had revealed that television does indeed reduce children’s imaginative capacities.

For instance, a large scale study carried out in Canada in the 1980s as television was gradually being extended across the country, compared children in three communities – one which had four TV channels, one with one channel and one with none. The researchers studied these communities on two occasions, just before one of the towns obtained television for the first time, and again two years later. The children in the no-TV town scored significantly higher than the others on divergent thinking skills, a measure of imaginativeness. This was until they, too, got TV – when their skills dropped to the same level as that of the other children.

The apparent stifling effect of watching TV on imagination is a concern, as imagination is important. Not only does it enrich personal experience, it is also necessary for empathy – imagining ourselves in someone else’s shoes – and is indispensable in creating change. The significance of boredom here is that children (indeed adults too) often fall back on television or – these days – a digital device, to keep boredom at bay.

Some years after my study, I began to notice certain creative professionals mentioning how important boredom was to their creativity, both in childhood and now. I interviewed some of them. One was writer and actress Meera Syal. She related how she had occupied school holidays staring out of the window at the rural landscape, and doing various things outside her “usual sphere”, like learning to bake cakes with the old lady next door. Boredom also made her write a diary, and it is to this that she attributes her writing career. “It’s very freeing, being creative for no other reason than that you freewheel and fill time,” she said.

Similarly, well-known neuroscientist Susan Greenfield said she had little to do as a child and spent much time drawing and writing stories. These became the precursors of her later work, the scientific study of human behaviour. She still chooses paper and pen over a laptop on a plane, and looks forward with relish to these constrained times.

Sporting, musical and other organised activities can certainly benefit a child’s physical, cognitive, cultural and social development. But children also need time to themselves – to switch off from the bombardment of the outside world, to daydream, pursue their own thoughts and occupations, and discover personal interests and gifts.

We don’t have to have a particular creative talent or intellectual bent to benefit from boredom. Just letting the mind wander from time to time is important, it seems, for everybody’s mental wellbeing and functioning. A study has even shown that, if we engage in some low-key, undemanding activity at same time, the wandering mind is more likely to come up with imaginative ideas and solutions to problems. So it’s good for children to be helped to learn to enjoy just pottering – and not to grow up with the expectation that they should be constantly on the go or entertained.

How to handle a bored child

Parents often feel guilty if children complain of boredom. But it’s actually more constructive to see boredom as an opportunity rather than a deficit. Parents do have a role, but rushing in with ready-made solutions is not helpful. Rather, children need the adults around them to understand that creating their own pastimes requires space, time and the possibility of making a mess (within limits – and to be cleared up afterwards by the children themselves).

They will need some materials too, but these need not be sophisticated – simple things are often more versatile. We’ve all heard of the toddler ignoring the expensive present and playing with the box it came in instead. For older children, a magnifying glass, some planks of wood, a basket of wool, and so on, might be the start of many happily occupied hours.

But to get the most benefit from times of potential boredom, indeed from life in general, children also need inner resources as well as material ones. Qualities such as curiosity, perseverance, playfulness, interest and confidence allow them to explore, create and develop powers of inventiveness, observation and concentration. These also help them to learn not to be deterred if something doesn’t work the first time, and try again. By encouraging the development of such capacities, parents offer children something of lifelong value.

If a child has run out of ideas, giving them some kind of challenge can prompt them to continue to amuse themselves imaginatively. This could range from asking them to find out what kind of food their toy dinosaurs enjoy in the garden to going off and creating a picture story with some friends and a digital camera.

Most parents would agree that they want to raise self-reliant individuals who can take initiatives and think for themselves. But filling a child’s time for them teaches nothing but dependence on external stimulus, whether material possessions or entertainment. Providing nurturing conditions and trusting children’s natural inclination to engage their minds is far more likely to produce independent, competent children, full of ideas.

+1 vote

                                        

Photo Source: Pick Any Two

By- Katie M. McLaughlin

http://pickanytwo.net/the-train-analogy-that-will-change-how-you-see-your-crying-child/

My 4-year-old was climbing into bed, his face turned away from me and toward the wall, when he asked the question.

“Where’s Glenn?”

His tone made the question sound like an afterthought, but I know better. Glenn is the opposite of an afterthought; he’s the tiger lovey blanket my son has been carting around with him since he was old enough to maintain a tight grasp. 

    The Train Analogy That Will Completely Change the Way You See Your Crying Child

My husband offered to head back downstairs to search, and I absently commented that I actually hadn’t seen Glenn around that evening, which was unusual.

At that, my son slowly turned around to face me but without making eye contact, his mind racing. His eyes were fixed on some background point as his mouth twisted and turned with each darting thought. They met mine only as he realized it, his shoulders straightening and his back growing taller as the panic scaled him. 

Finally, the shout: “I left Glenn in the back of Gigi’s car!!!”


Gigi, of course, was one state away by this point, which means we were facing my son’s first night since he was an infant—the first night ever in his little memory—without Glenn curled up in the crook of his arm.

Oh, sure, we’d lost Glenn before, but he’d always been found before bedtime, even if sometimes it required what felt like hours of searching. And then there was the time my son held him out the car window and accidentally let go, so Glenn spent a bit of time playing chicken on the yellow lines of a busy street. 

But still, there had never been a bedtime without Glenn.

The initial shock was, of course, followed by electric currents of anger that coursed through my son’s little body. He punched the air and gritted his teeth and screamed, “I WILL NOT SLEEP WITHOUT GLENN! I WILL NOT GO TO BED UNTIL HE’S HERE! I WILL NOT GO TO BED EVER AGAIN!” More punching, more gritting, a few angry flops onto the floor. 

At this point my husband had returned from his futile search, and was looking at me for direction. How are we handling this one, mama? 

I don’t know if the look I shot back reflected confidence, wisdom, and clarity, but believe it or not, that’s what I felt.

Because right when I needed it most, I remembered the train analogy.

The Life-Changing Train Analogy 

The analogy was nothing new, something I’d learned in my own therapy years before I had kids and something we’ve all heard in the form of an overused cliche. Truthfully, I’d always struggled to apply it to my own rush of emotions, but here, with my poor child flopping around on the floor like a fish out of water, it seemed like the only reasonable response.

The analogy goes like this:

Difficult feelings are tunnels, and we are trains traveling through them. 

We have to move all the way through the darkness to get to the—you knew this was coming!—calm, peaceful light at the end of the tunnel.

It sounds simple, but it’s way easier said than done.

Where Well-Meaning Parents Go Wrong

The problem is that we well-meaning parents and caregivers often attempt to intercept our children on their journey through an emotional tunnel.

For example, watching my son wrestle with his anger and sadness and fear at not having his lovey, I could easily have said:

It’s only one night. We’ll get him back tomorrow.

We have so many other stuffed animals, just sleep with one of them tonight.

You’ll be fine, I promise.

Those would all have been true statements, not doubt, but they would not have been helpful ones.

So often when our kids are struggling with a difficult feeling—sadness, anger, fear, embarrassment, loneliness, guilt—we try to logic them out of it. We explain why they’re overreacting, or how WE know it will turn out just fine in the end.

We’re trying to help our children, of course, but if we peel back the layers a bit, I think we’ll find that what we’re really doing is trying to make OURSELVES feel better. Because our children’s pain hurts US so deeply, makes US so acutely uncomfortable. 

We’re the ones who want their crying to stop as quickly as possible—not them. 

Back to the analogy: If emotions are tunnels and we are trains going through them, then we NEED to keep moving all the way through to the other side. 

What we adults often do when facing our own emotional struggles is attempt to get out of the tunnel early—banging on the sides, ignoring the cavernous echo, and wondering with confusion why we can’t see daylight yet.

Sometimes we squat in the darkness, close our eyes, and just pretend we’re not in a tunnel at all. Everything is just fine, thank you very much.

Sometimes we do a whole host of other things—eat ice cream, drink wine, shop online, run marathons, binge watch Netflix, play games on our phones or scroll mindlessly through Facebook—to distract ourselves from the fact that we’re in a tunnel in the first place.

But none of those things gets us out of the tunnel, does it? 

Then, when we FINALLY let ourselves scream and wail and bang our fists and crumble onto the floor and have a good cry, we suddenly feel so. much. better. 

Same goes for our kids. We can’t teach them there’s some secret side exit when there’s really not. There is no way out except through, and it’s our job to guide them there. 

That’s why I didn’t say a word to my son. Instead, I just sat next to him as the ripples of anger melted into shaking and sobbing. When I thought it was OK to do so, I started rubbing his back—still without speaking. He kept crying and crying and crying. 

As those tears flowed, I realized I had just done what Gordon Neufeld and Gabor Mate call “dancing our children to their tears.” In their book Hold On to Your Kids they write:

“…a parent must dance the child to his tears, to letting go, and to the sense of rest that comes in the wake of letting go…[a parent must] come alongside the child’s experience of frustration and provide comfort. The agenda should not be to teach a lesson but to move frustration to sadness…Much more important than our words is the child’s sense that we are with her, not against her.” 

With that in mind, I was actually delighted that my son was shaking with sobs because I knew that meant he was traveling through this emotional tunnel rather than getting stuck in it.

He cried and he cried and he cried.

Until he wasn’t crying anymore. 

Until, from his vantage point splayed out on the floor, he caught a glimpse of a nearby book about world-recording-holding dogs, pulled it over, and started paging through it. As if nothing had happened at all. 

I peeked at the clock. It had been eight minutes. 

Building Resilience

I decided speaking would be OK now, so I asked my son if he wanted to make a plan. I told him I knew that bedtime tonight would be extra tough, but maybe we could think of some ideas together to help him through it. 

(Had I suggested such a thing two minutes prior, he would have EXPLODED. But because I waited until his train was through this tunnel, it was fine.) 

Without any additional prompting from me, my 4-year-old chose two different stuffed animals to sleep with that night, then asked if we could read two extra books before bed to help make the evening more special. 

Later, as I kissed him goodnight and he turned onto his side to fall asleep, he said peacefully, “I’m going to be OK tonight.” 

Yes, dear son, you are.

Because this is where resilience is built.

Had I driven an hour each way to retrieve Glenn, we wouldn’t have built resilience. 

Had I told him over and over again it was no big deal, it’s just one night without one stuffed animal, we wouldn’t have built resilience either. The message there would have been that his pain was invalid and that his struggles weren’t worth being taken seriously.

But simply sitting by his side as bumped his way through the tunnel? Allowing him to feel the rush and the panic, and then come up for air all on his own? THAT is building resilience.

Remember Your Job

So the next time your child is deeply frustrated, angry, or upset, remember what the job of a parent really is.

The job of a parent is to:

  • Provide comfort through the frustration.
  • Draw out our child’s cleansing tears.
  • Show empathy to our child’s struggle.
  • Allow the life lesson to be learned naturally—not through preaching.
  • Support our child’s journey through the emotional tunnel.

The job of a parent is NOT to get our child to stop crying as quickly as possible. Tears are a sign of parental success, not failure.

So rub your child’s back. Sit with them in silence. Stay alongside them as they chug chug chug through their tunnels of feelings. And be with them when they finally reach the calm, peaceful light at the end.

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