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Dear Zindagi: Don't let the dark side of exams cast a shadow on your child's happiness

+1 vote
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Dayashankar Mishra

Every parent wants their child to do well in life and wants them to get good marks in their exams.                         However, the fiercely competitive world certainly doesn't make things easier. But do marks or a percentage hold a higher priority than your own child? Every year when school board results are declared, it brings with it a wave of depression and a number of suicides among students.

http://zeenews.india.com/blogs/dont-let-the-dark-side-of-exams-cast-a-shadow-on-your-childs-happiness-parental-support-goes-a-long-way-2010215.html

Who is to blame? Is parental pressure to do 'better than your siblings/cousins/friends/neighbours' worth more than your child's happiness and mental wellbeing? Parents sometimes forget that children are a part of them. So what if they didn't score as per your expectations? Should their percentage become a measuring unit for your love for them?

At that point, your love and support is the only thing a child requires - a promise that you're with them at every step of their life, to pick them up when they fall. Because there is no shame in falling down, but there is pride in getting back up. Don't let a mere marksheet make or break the bond of love and compassion you hold for your child. Let them make mistakes, they are, after all, human too.

Salutations to those parents who find a way to celebrate with their children regardless of how they scored in their exams. You might not know it right now, but your unconditional support will definitely help your child later in life and you will see it when they live their life with their heads held high.

Show them love, give them hope, be their pillar of strength like you should, because a small speed-bump should never decide the journey of their life.

posted Jun 2, 2017 by Krinz Kiran

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Photo credit   V. Srinivas Murthy, The Hindu.com

From a foundation in memory of a friend to a library on the move, young professionals in the city are taking books to those who need them the most

Sarumthy K.

Children at Twinkle Library, which was inaugurated this month, at Cheshire Home on Old Airport Road                  

http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-national/tp-karnataka/they-are-on-a-mission-to-spread-wide-the-joy-of-reading/article19078809.ece

Children living in the neighbourhood of a primary school and crèche run by city-based trust Sewac-B in Guddadahalli, Hebbal, were pleasantly surprised a year ago when stacks of books were delivered to their premises.

It heralded the birth of a library— a gift by four friends.

Under the banner Nirupa Reading Foundation, city-based Rajni Singh and her friends — Vikram Sridhar, Sindhu Naik, and Kapil Vardhan — started setting up libraries in children’s homes, schools, and old age homes across the city. The initiative began last year, and to date, they have set up three libraries—two in Bengaluru and one in Gurugram (Haryana).

Their plan is to spread the habit of reading in cities across India.

Apart from the crèche, the second library in Bengaluru — christened Twinkle Library — was inaugurated this month at Cheshire Home on Old Airport Road.

Nirupa Reading Foundation, which was registered as a trust in March this year, was started in memory of their friend Nirupa, who died after battling cancer at the age of 36. Nirupa, Ms. Singh, and Ms. Naik met when they were part of Runner Girls India, an all-women runners group in Bengaluru, in 2007

“I introduced Nirupa to Vikram and Kapil and we used to travel together extensively. We were almost like a family,” Ms. Singh says. “Nirupa was very fond of reading. We wanted to keep her memory alive in a constructive way, and that is how the foundation came about. We want to give the gift of reading to underprivileged children and adults through the trust,” Ms. Singh, a 41-year-old software engineer, adds.

The Hebbal library is operated by the crèche staff five days a week for two hours in the evening. The children were asked to come up with a name for the library and it was christened “Happy library”. The library has 500 books, of which 120 are in Kannada and the remaining in English.

“Nirupa Reading Foundation contacted us and set up a well-structured library. Now, at least 20 children visit the library every day from the neighbourhood. We also have a librarian to assist the children,” Shalini Joshi, secretary, Sewac-B, says.

At Cheshire Home, which provides care, treatment, and education support to about 45 physically challenged and visually impaired children, 300 children’s books have already been stacked in a cupboard. Most of the books are pre-owned and donated. “The new books are funded by our friends and relatives. We have not gone for corporate funding as of now,” Ms. Singh adds.

The librarians at the two facilities have been trained and all books are colour coded to match with the children’s reading levels. “We have followed the Hippocampus Reading Foundation’s Grow by Reading Model so that children read books appropriate for their age and reading capacity,” she concludes.

 

 

+2 votes

In a search for solutions to some of the biggest challenges facing people around the world, the second day of the Unite Conference in Rotterdam looked to build bridges from schools to politicians to policies.                               The world and its multitude of problems may appear overwhelming at first glance, but the mood at Education International (EI)’s Unite for Quality Education and Leadership Conference in The Netherlands’ Education City 2017 could be summed up into one word: action.

http://edupost.in/students/read/from-the-classroom-to-the-world-and-back-educators-take-on-a-global-perspec

That was the message conveyed by speakers and ideas stemming from discussions during day two of the three-day event. The tone of the day was set with the powerful and memorable words of Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Kailash Satyarthi. The champion of children’s rights, and long-time friend of EI, Satyarthi brought current political and social issues to the fore.  

“Before so many walls are constructed around and inside of us, let's unite the world through bridges of compassion,” he said. “Teachers can lead with conscience, courage and compassion to help build a child-friendly world.”                                                                                                                                                                       The Nobel Laureate announced his new 100 Million for 100 Million Campaign, which was fully endorsed and supported by EI General Secretary Fred van Leeuwen. The initiative seeks to see that the world’s 100 million child labourers are set free. Of Satyarthi van Leeuwen said that “his story is one of vocational perseverance, dedication to his values and plain and simple hard work.”

His words were also appropriate on day when the troubling trend of post truth was discussed in the context of education, and how teachers can work to counter the reality of false facts. And the theme of compassion and human connection was also relevant as the contentious issue of standardised testing was put to the debate floor. Steffen Handel of the Norwegian EI affiliate UEN exchanged his views with the OECD’s Yuri Belfali.

+1 vote

Engaging children while reading to them can better activate their brains, say scientists who suggest that simply speaking words aloud from a book may not be enough to improve cognitive development in toddlers. The study involved functional MRI scans of 22 4-year-old girls to explore the link between engagement and verbal interactivity during a mother-child reading observation and neural activation and connectivity during a story listening task.

http://www.deccanheraldepaper.com/

Children exhibiting greater interest in the narrative showed increased activation in right-sided cerebellar areas of the brain, thought to support cognitive skill acquisition and refinement via connection to language, association and executive function areas.

The study, led by researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Centre in the US, reinforces the value of "dialogic reading," where the child is encouraged to actively participate. "The takeaway for parents in this study is that they should engage more when reading with their child, ask questions, have them turn the page, and interact with each other," said John Hutton, a pediatrician at Cincinnati Children's Hospital and lead author of the study.

"In turn, this could fuel brain activation - or turbocharge the development of literacy skills, particularly comprehension, in preschool aged children," explained Hutton.

+1 vote

Friends celebrate with Ashwin Rao, who scored 99.4% in ICSE examinations, on Monday. He is the student of St Paul's English School, JP Nagar, Bengaluru. DH Photo

Bengaluru: Ashwin Rao, a student of St Paul's English School, is on cloud nine.

Flanked by his parents and grandparents, he cannot stop smiling. With a score of 99.4%, he has surpassed last year's topper Abhineet Parichha from Odisha. Ashwin has company for the first rank, sharing it with Pune's Muskan Abdullah Pathan.

http://www.deccanheraldepaper.com/

His father Dwarka Rao feels it was the hard work and a little luck that helped Ashwin achieve the feat. "We were expecting 96% to 98%, but it was basically his expectations that he needed to meet. He never attended tuitions and was very focused about his exams. Various school activities helped, as it gave him some time off," said Rao, who works with automotive giant Fiat-Chrysler.

Ashwin says he gave time to all subjects, but focused on the subjects he liked. "Computer Science and Maths are my favorite subjects, so I spent a lot of time on them. I like Computer Science so much that I even wrote a Java program for tic-tac-toe during my holidays." His mother Lakshmi Rao said Ashwin holds a red belt in Kung-fu and feels he is naturally gifted to handle studies and extracurricular activities with equal aplomb. "He exceeded all expectations and we are on the moon."

Dwarka Rao, Father of Ashwin Rao: He never attended tuitions and was very focused about his exams. School activities helped, giving him some time off.

 

+2 votes

NEW DELHI: India has taken a firm step towards building 20 world-class educational institutions, which will be termed Institutions of Eminence, with the human resource development ministry moving the proposal to the Union Cabinet for approval. Firmly bearing the stamp of the Prime Minister’s Office, this is a new framework to catapult Indian institutions to global recognition by freeing the best of them from the University Grants Commission’s restrictive regulatory regime and ushering in an unprecedented level of institutional autonomy. Here are some of the finer details:

http://www.bullfax.com/?q=node-modi-govt-firming-plan-create-indias-own-harvard

WHAT WILL MAKE THEM ‘EMINENT’ The UGC (Institutions of Eminence Deemed to be Universities) regulations, 2017 will govern all such institutions that are conferred with this status, ensuring their complete academic, administrative and financial autonomy. These regulations will override all other UGC regulations and free the institutions of UGC’s restrictive inspection regime, the regulatory control over fee and curriculum.

* The institutions will have to achieve a place in the top 500 of any of the global rankings within 10 years of being declared an institution of eminence and eventually reach the top 100 slot * They will have a teacher: student ratio of 1:20 to begin with and 1:10 in five years, with a student enrolment of 15,000 in 15 years. There will be a good mix of Indian and international faculty, and only those who come with a degree from top 500 institutions in global rankings will be considered eligible foreign faculty. * The institutions will be free to select students through a merit-based transparent admission process to ensure no meritorious student is turned away for lack of funds.

Up to 30% foreign students vis-à-vis the strength of domestic students can be admitted. The institution will be free to decide its fee structure but will have to declare it in a transparent manner. Any reports of capitation fee will be treated as serious violation.

An Ombudsman will be set up to cater to student grievances. * One paper will have to be published per faculty member per year on average in a reputed peer reviewed international journal, with publications included in SCOPUS, Web Science, etc. to be counted as a research publication. A world-class library with subscriptions to reputed journals related to courses offered will have to be maintained along with cutting-edge research in frontier areas.

Read more at: http://www.bullfax.com/?q=node-modi-govt-firming-plan-create-indias-own-harvard

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